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Monthly Archives: October 2013

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Proteus is weird. There’s not much else like it out there, however that doesn’t mean to say it’s better than everything else because it’s different.

This is a game of pure exploration, and not much else. It’s a virtual nature-walk with old-school graphics.

There is fun to be had in that, it’s bright colours allow it to look very pretty, and the games music sounds fantastic.

Speaking of music, it is a strong point of the game. The players movement and location controls it, with sombre tracks on high lonely hills, and upbeat melodies in the lush green forests. Each kind of animal you encounter adds their own flourish to the soundtrack, giving the game that extra bit of personality.

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All this sight and sound comes together to something pretty lovely. A short and sweet little game.

The problem however is that it isn’t really much beyond that, it doesn’t offer a lot that the traditional videogame would.

And that could lead some to being very oppositional to it, Proteus is just a game that a lot of people aren’t going to understand, but that’s absolutely fine.

It does make this much harder to write about the game, I’m unsure of the type of person who would like it. I know I did, but people have also told me that it’s the worst thing they’ve played in a while, because it lacks the ‘core parts of being a videogame’.

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I’m of the opinion that Proteus is most certainly a videogame, it does fun things with it’s interactivity, and I feel something can easily become a game with the smallest amount of interactivity.

There’s no winning and losing in Proteus, no roadblocks, no challenges, no boss fights. You walk around a little island that looks and sounds really nice. I honestly can’t say whether or not you would like that. It might be worth giving a go, but don’t say I told you it was amazing.

The version of Proteus played for review was on PSVita, it is also available on PS3 and PC. Review code was supplied by Curve Studios.

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1If you’ve played Telltale’s The Walking Dead, I think you’d sort of know what you’re in for here.

This plays just like that, it takes the adventure game format, and instead of making it about ‘item a’ in ‘slot b’ style puzzles, it gives more of a focus on narrative choices, mostly through dialogue.

Often at times you’re given a timer, and forced to make a decision that doesn’t quite have a clear cut right or wrong answer.

They’re also both released episodically, which worked great because it gave it a similar feel to a new TV show, complete with the whole dialogue of “Oh did you see that new episode”, “No man don’t spoil!”

As much as there are similarities, this does not feel the same.

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For a start it’s a much more colourful game, set during the 80s, it makes use of a bright pinks and light blues, but it’s shadowy night-time setting gives a gritty noir tone to the visuals.

The pacing feels slower, it doesn’t have the constant sense of dread that came from The Walking Dead’s apocalyptic setting.

Once I had gotten quite into the game, I stopped doing internal comparisons, and started appreciating the game for it’s own aspects.

It’s based on the comic book Fables, and has a murder mystery, peppered with aspects of class tension, all presented through fairy tale characters in a modern setting, known in-game as ‘fables’. Most of the non-human looking ones have bought ‘glamours’ a spell which allows them to appear human, however it costs money.

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And Telltale have managed to make good characters out of them. The Big Bad Wolf reformed and is now Bigby Wolf, sheriff of Fabletown, New York. Most fables see him as too strict and controlling, how he sees himself is up to you through the dialogue choices. Mr Toad has gone from the lavishness of Toad Hall to a cheap apartment where he can’t even afford a glamour to make himself look human, and is frustrated by it.

Then there is an interrogation scene, which you look around a crime scene in someone’s house, and ask them questions. Picking the right dialogue choices to catch them off guard is really cool, I wouldn’t want to spoil too much of it, but I think it’s experiencing for yourself.

But it does have it’s drawbacks, towards the beginning a few of the fight scenes feel like they lack impact, and are heavily dependant on timed button prompts. It’s a shame because at times those sorts of button prompts were used to such good effect in the Walking Dead. Also if you’re the impatient sort, you might have to tolerate some load times, but nothing crazy significant.

For now though this is a good first start, and has made me hopeful for future episodes.

The Wolf Among Us Episode 1 is available on XBLA, PSN and Steam. Steam requires you to buy all episodes at once, a season pass is available for XBLA and PSN to gain every episode when they are released.


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One of my favourite things about this game are benches.

It sounds mundane, but sitting on a bench moves the camera out to give a full view of the area, and the locations in Brothers are beautiful.

It’s great looking in general, with a lovely soundtrack to compliment it’s visuals, and despite the lack of any understandable dialogue it manages to tell a great story through sight and sound.

It opens with simple premise of two brothers journeying off to a far land to find medicine for their sick father, and builds to a very emotional conclusion.

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The control scheme can take a small amount used to, each brother is controlled with either analogue stick, and can sometimes feel like the videogame equivalent of patting your head and rubbing your belly. However there isn’t really a lot of dexterity required in playing Brothers, and the controls really serve to pack an emotional punch in certain scenes.

Following a recent trend with certain games, I managed to finish it in one sitting, about 3 hours-ish. I like that, it can give a more ‘movie-like’ pacing to these sorts of games, it also means that there’s never a dull moment in the game. I’d rather take a great 3 hour experience over a 40 hour slog.

If you have an evening, or lazy afternoon to spare, I’d recommend giving Brothers a try, especially if you like purely narrative driven games.

Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons is available to buy on Steam, Xbox Live, and Playstation Network.



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