Getting into the habit of writing about games

Monthly Archives: June 2020

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You know what, I’ve been having a really good time writing these so far and I’m looking forward to doing more of them after this one. I’ve played eight games in the Final Fantasy series for these blog posts and I’ve found something interesting about all of them so far.

Playing these games in chronological order has made it much easier to move between them. I’m no longer staring at a massive wall of many games in this series unsure of where to go next, I’m simply just moving ahead through a linear list.

I’m aware that the last article did go on quite long, so I’ve decided to play two games instead of three. For this one I played:

  • Final Fantasy V (FF5)
  • Final Fantasy VI (FF6)

I decided to play the Game Boy Advance (GBA) ports of these games as they seemed like the more ideal offerings. Prior versions made before it are saddled with translations in a style that I’m not a fan of. More recent editions, such as those available iOS and Steam, have an awful graphical style that looks tacky to me. It was nice to go between these two games and have a somewhat consistent presentation, which only highlighted the major differences both of these games have. Someone did inform me that certain scenes are cropped for GBA versions, meaning they might not make the same impact, but I only found that out as I was approaching the final area of Final Fantasy VI, so I didn’t fancy starting over.

As I was playing the games for this article I essentially saw Final Fantasy transitioning into what I know it for. I’ll get into more specifics on this when I talk about each game but broadly speaking, FF5 feels like a tribute and FF6 is trying something new.

When writing this blog piece, I found that it became increasingly difficult to not mention particular major plot moments. In earlier games I found it much easier to talk in broader terms, but here I’m going to have to address certain spoilers. So I’ll talk about the games now:

Final Fantasy V

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Compared to prior games, Final Fantasy V is much more immediate. There’s much less story setup before the game becomes playable. The full party comes together very quickly, and shortly after that it brings in a job system to play with.

Just like in Final Fantasy III, this game has a job system, however much of the frustrations from that initial job system have been removed. Swapping between job classes now has no penalties, and when you assign a job to a character, they already have full access to its capabilities. Levelling up a job lets you carry over its abilities onto others, so if you level up a White Mage, you can get a Monk class to cast White Magic. I found this a much more interesting incentive for strengthening jobs, as it also encouraged me to play around and use all sorts of them for party members.

Once a job is maxed out, all of its passive abilities and stat increases get carried over a class called Freelancer. What that meant is that I ended up finding an ideal grinding spot and spent a large amount of time maxing out several jobs per character in order to have super powerful Freelancers (not all the jobs though, I would probably still be playing the game if that was the case). It was a little repetitive, but I saw it somewhat like slowly carving something. It was a little like I was partially moulding the game into the way I wanted to play it. I don’t have anything physical to show for it, but it was still fun to see strengthened party members used by the end of the game. I do wish the grind could have gone a little faster though…

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Battles play out much in the same way they did in FF4, though with a party of four instead of five. The ATB combat system sees continued use up until Final Fantasy X, so re-explaining the system each time would be a little tiresome. While it is using the same systems as 4, FF5 has some battles that take much better advantage of it.

There’s a fight I liked in this game against a monster called Atomos. It’s an interesting puzzle boss and one of the most fun encounters in the game. When the battle starts it instantly kills a party member, but once that member is dead it won’t kill another. The defeated party member then gets slowly sucked towards Atomos and when they get close enough they are removed from the encounter entirely and cannot be brought back. Once that member is gone, Atomos will kill another and repeat the same process. As this all happens in real time, it becomes about finding the right time to revive a party member so that none are lost. It feels much more unique than any of the other battles I encountered in the game, and the real-time combat systems allow battles like this to happen.

All this stuff is cool, but I don’t think that it works well together to tell a story like FF4 did. The job system doesn’t give much of a sense of character in a way that 4’s pre-assigned classes did. Final Fantasy V has a fairly standard save-the-world story with a much more light-hearted tone that didn’t really win me over as much. Characters make jokes about their situation but that’s what characters do in almost every major movie these days. I’ve already seen about twenty Marvel movies.

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The party hardly ever changes shape here. The four members you get at the start remain throughout most of the game and initially the game leans into that. There’s a few moments towards the start of the game that make the party feel like they’re all getting closer to each other and I enjoyed that, and they do manage to make them feel like distinct characters. I wish there were more moments like that throughout the game as too much focus was put on the plot of defeating the bad guy.

Graphically and musically it mostly feels like a gradual change from FF4, but there’s some new things here that I liked. Enemy designs get a little more varied with some weird and cute ones. FF4’s music used a lot of samples that were trying to mostly emulate orchestral instruments, but some more synthesizer-like sounds work their way into FF5’s soundtrack.

There’s a lot I do like about Final Fantasy V, but it doesn’t work as a cohesive whole. The job system is cool, there’s some boss fights that are fun, but the narrative isn’t as compelling. In some ways it almost feels like a “remix compilation album” of Final Fantasy in terms of how it’s put together. A lot of plot beats feel like reworks of what was already in FF3 and 4, and bringing in a revitalised job system is absolutely harkening back to FF3 as well. However much like compilation albums, they may be a good set of songs but they weren’t written to flow into each other.

Having that job system did make it really fun to play with, it’s just that I can’t help but compare it with other games. I don’t want to come across as negative here because I did have a very good time with this one, it’s just that I had a better time with Final Fantasy IV.

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I’d also like to talk about the Four Job Fiesta, which is a charity run of this game that anyone can take part in from this website. However if you’ve never played the game before I would advise against trying this specific run for your first time, as I made that mistake a few years ago. It seems as though it’s much easier to manage with some familiarity of the game, but I also seemed to just end up with a group of classes that were extremely difficult to use. 

It’s all for charity though which I can’t fault that much. This year it’s raising money for Color of Change, the largest racial justice organization in America. Considering recent news stories about horrible injustices against Black people, I think it was a smart decision to choose this charity. It runs until the end of August so you’ve got some time to decide if you want to take part or donate.

Final Fantasy V also had a sequel in the form of an anime, which is absolutely not worth watching. Final Fantasy: Legend of the Crystals is an extremely generic early 90s fantasy-comedy anime. It’s well animated, but doesn’t have much of a unique style. I did call it a comedy, but that’s arguable since much of its jokes aren’t really funny. It’s a real shame since this was directed by Rintaro, who also worked on the excellent 2001 film Metropolis, which if you haven’t seen I think you should as it’s one of my favourite animated movies (I also talked about it on this podcast).

Final Fantasy VI

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This game was one of my biggest blind spots. Of all the Final Fantasies I hadn’t played before this was one that I hadn’t heard that much about. I can think of a lot of reasons why but that would take up plenty of space. I know the game now since I’ve played it.

Final Fantasy VI is maximalist. When I think of other RPGs developed for the SNES, they don’t have as many toys to play with as this one does. There are 14 characters to choose for your party, plenty of optional side quests to pursue, a higher amount of graphical detail and a much larger soundtrack. I get a sense that many meetings during the development of this game ended with “yes we’ll try that new idea”.

This also the first game to have more bespoke setpieces with game mechanics specific to them, which is something that I associate with Final Fantasy in general. When I think of memorable moments across the games, many of them use a unique method of control. It’ll be an interesting thing to bring up again when I write about later games.

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What this all means is that Final Fantasy VI has a lot more variety, it’s playing a little bit looser with the rules of what makes an RPG. Here’s a few things I did in this game:

  • Command multiple parties of moogles to defend a fallen party member
  • Sneak through an enemy occupied town by getting around guards and stealing uniforms to use as disguises
  • Memorise lines to perform well in an opera.

Every party member now has a unique distinct ability that they can use in combat. Some are just ones that you can select from a menu, but some involve weirder elements such as slot machines, timers or fighting game button inputs.

Magic spells can be learned by almost every party member in the game (and by the end I had a team that knew almost all the spells). Though it seems a little contrary to the idea of variety that everyone can learn the same spells, I feel it actually acts in service of it, since it makes every party member a viable choice. This is Final Fantasy VI’s way of saying that everything is open to play with.

This is bolstered by another mechanic named “Espers”, which are equippable summon attacks that are the game’s way of teaching magic. They can be used to increase character stats as well, so a party member ill-equipped to cast magic can be made into a strong spellcaster. This means that the game does not have to contrive moments where a character with healing abilities show up, it just has to consider who is the right character to show up (this contrasts with Final Fantasy IV’s approach. Because of every character fitting a defined character class, it sometimes felt like characters would show up because they fit a practical role).

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However because of these open systems, the game can become incredibly easy. There’s a possibility that my own long experience with the genre has coloured this, but Final Fantasy VI ended up being one of the easiest games in the series I have ever played. Certain items I received from doing side-content almost made me feel like I was cheating, as I could do almost 50,000 damage in a single turn (for reference the final boss of the game has 62,000 HP). 

Even though it got very easy, it was really fun to continually outdo myself on my damage output, since I did have a little bit of a challenge closer to the start of the game. Long before I encountered the Espers, there was a moment where I had a party that was only suited to doing physical damage and I had a small supply of healing items. I felt as though I could have gotten badly stuck at that moment, but I managed to scrape by and comparing that to how powerful my party became is very amusing to me.

Rather than take FF4’s approach by having systems tied closely with the story it’s telling, Final Fantasy VI decides to have them work around the story. They hardly get in the way of the plot, especially since they can result in the game getting very easy. I wouldn’t say that this made the storytelling worse at all, I would say more of its failings come from how the characters are written.

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For one thing, I felt as though the large cast of characters works against it. Around a third of the party I had never even heard of before, which I don’t think I can say so easily about a lot of other games in the series. I didn’t know of Strago, Relm, Cyan, and if I hadn’t played Kingdom Hearts II before I would never have known of Setzer before. A lot of them don’t feel particularly memorable to me, which is a shame.

I did hear a lot about Kefka before I played this game, he’s one of the Final Fantasy villains that seems to get brought up quite a lot. And it’s actually a twist that he’s the villain by the way, I didn’t know about that before which took a bit of the impact of that reveal. The one advantage Kefka has compared to previous villains is that he actually shows up for more of the game. His entire character is that he is just pure evil, and it’s a bit too one-dimensional for me. It’s not as though the other villains we’ve had so far have had more powerful characterisation (FF4’s didn’t even show up until the end of the game), it’s that I just don’t find this brand of evil for the sake of evil interesting for as much screen time as it takes.

The one neat thing they do with Kefka is the setup for the game’s second half (it was for me, but apparently this is fairly flexible and not far from the end if you avoid side-content). Essentially Kefka wins, defeats the party and destroys most of the world, and then a year passes. From that point a few party members manage to get together and begin a search for the rest of the team (or you can skip all that and go straight to the final dungeon). This part of the game is often called the “World of Ruin”. Kefka has no on-screen presence until the final boss encounter, but the state of the world means that you don’t forget about him. One of the first events in this part involves him destroying a large house because something upset him.

From this point on the structure of the game is blown wide open, and I found it really fun to just explore the map and see where I would find other party members. I somewhat liked how it was used to fleshed out the characters a little more since I got a chance to find out what they would get up to alone.

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In my opinion it does a better job with some characters and a lacklustre effort with others. Catching Cyan pretending to be someone else writing letters to a woman was funny, especially since he has a unique manner of old-fashioned speech that is used in the letters. When I was pursuing Locke, the self-proclaimed treasure hunter, I went through a dungeon that had mostly empty chests. After finishing it, he handed me the items that would have been in those chests.

One character that I was really let down by was Terra. Throughout most of the game she has a rather distant personality, likely because of being raised in captivity to be a soldier for the Empire. In the World of Ruin, she is the only one that needs to be convinced to join your party, but mostly because she’s become a mother figure to a big group of orphaned children. It just feels really boring to have one of the few major female characters just settle and become a mother, especially when so many of them have been going off on more exciting adventures. Celes doesn’t fare much better either, as a fair amount of time with her character is spent on how she’s in love with Locke. 

For a lot of the World of Ruin, you can bring along whatever party members you want, but the result of that means that no character’s voice really comes through whenever any dialogue needs to be said. It’s usually written so that no name appears on it, so it’s written in a way that any party member can say it, so it’s extremely functional. It persists up until the final encounter with Kefka and I just found it to be very dry. I wonder if it’s likely the version of the game I’ve chosen, maybe there’s other ones out there that write it more interestingly because I wasn’t digging it.

One party member was absent from the World of Ruin for me, and that was Shadow. This was because I let him die by mistake. In most of these games character death is an event determined solely by the game, but here I was partially responsible. I would have never guessed the way to have him survive (there’s a timed escape sequence before the World of Ruin, and you have to wait for the last second before leaving the area) but I did find out I could have prevented it.

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In terms of appearance, I think Final Fantasy VI has been one of the best looking games so far. It doesn’t have the same amount of detail as the PSP versions of FF1, 2 and 4, but it does have a more deliberate muted colour palette that suits the steampunk-ish setting. Environments also feel a little bit more natural, they look less like they’re made on a grid (even though character movement is still restricted to four directions).

This game also has the best soundtrack so far out of the games played for this post. It’s larger and like the rest of the game, more varied. Even more electronic instruments come through here, with a chocobo theme that reminded me a little of japanese electronic music group Yellow Magic Orchestra. Prior games would sometimes work in the main theme as a regular motif, but FF6’s music has more use of leitmotif as character themes are woven in through the score. There’s also a track called Epitaph, which I’m certain is a King Crimson reference since the melody sounds very similar to another one of their songs called Moonchild.

I had a good time with Final Fantasy VI, messing around with the growth systems and how they made battles very easy was quite fun for me. I’m just underwhelmed by the character writing in this game. I am aware that this game is beloved, and it is a good game, it’s just that I’ve played better.

Final Thoughts

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It’s easy to think about putting these games into groups, I titled my initial blog post on the first three games “The NES Trilogy”. I can’t really think of FF4, 5 and 6 as a SNES trilogy, even though they have a similar kind of presentation, FF6 feels more like what the series would eventually do on the PlayStation. I’m looking forward to talking more about that soon.

I enjoyed these two games quite a lot, but when I think about my all-time favourite games in the series, they aren’t going to be among the top. There’s a possibility that I might even change my mind by the time I get to the games I adore, though the real hope is that I’ll still love them.

There has been some brilliant music across both the games, which I’ve compiled into this Spotify playlist! I did have some urges to put the entire FF6 soundtrack on, but I decided against that.

Ranking these games hasn’t gotten difficult yet, but once I play a lot more of these I assume it’s going to get harder and I wonder what it will look like after that. The idea of making a gigantic list with all the games on it is very funny to me, even if it is a little potentially unreadable. Anyway here’s the eight games I played for this so far with the best at the bottom of the list:

  • Final Fantasy II
  • Final Fantasy Mystic Quest
  • Final Fantasy Adventure
  • Final Fantasy
  • Final Fantasy III
  • Final Fantasy V
  • Final Fantasy VI
  • Final Fantasy IV

I’m hoping to take a little break between this article and the next as it’s going to be a big one. Already I’ve got a lot of thoughts in my head about what I’ll be writing for it. I’ll give you a hint, what comes after six?

Until next time!



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