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While I’ve pitched this as a chronological retrospective on Final Fantasy, it made too much sense to jump ahead with the various games that relate to Final Fantasy VII. Now that I’ve actually played through Final Fantasy VII Remake, I can say that it was a good idea to do it. Having fresh knowledge of them all made it much easier to write this out.

Videogame remakes have been on my mind since I played the reimaginings of Resident Evil 2 and 3 earlier this year. The difference with those is that I didn’t have as much experience with the original source that those were based on, so what I came out of those with was opinions on which one was more effective as a horror game (2 is excellent, 3 is a letdown).

However, since I’ve recently taken a closer look at the original Final Fantasy VII, that familiarity gives me a different lens that makes me unable to compare everything to how it was done before. 

I’ll be talking about this game in a fair amount of detail, so if you still want to be surprised by how Remake reinterprets everything, maybe come back and read later. Maybe you could share this article with a friend who’s already played it.

Final Fantasy VII Remake

I was very interested to see what a modern take on FF7 would be. Many of the directorial staff from the original game returned for it, and when creatives return to the same story it’s often either scaled up or used to address different themes.

Actually playing Final Fantasy VII Remake is more like going to see a concert by an old favourite band. They’ll play the hits and have some new and exciting renditions of old songs, but then some of that won’t quite live up to the original quality found in original recordings. There’s also a bunch of new material, some of which is good and some I’m not so sure about.

The band has opted for a much more grandiose sound this time around, since a lot of the dials are turned up here. There’s so much more graphical detail, towns are much larger, characters have bigger personalities, key moments have more dramatic heft, it’s a harder game, and a much longer one too.

It’s strange that this hasn’t been titled “Part 1” because that’s what this is. Square Enix took the first six hours of FF7 and broadened the scope of it to make it into a 30-40 hour epic. Of course there are also some things from later in the original game that have been included, most likely out of an attempt to make this game seem more compelling. For example, Sephiroth shows up a lot more here since you seemingly can’t have Final Fantasy VII without Sephiroth.

I was a little worried that the polluted planet angle would have been a little diluted, but it actually comes in a much more concentrated dosage this time around. Areas outside Midgar look considerably more barren here, Shinra is shown to be just as greedy as ever, and when it’s made clear by the end that Sephiroth is the biggest threat to the planet it’s still mentioned that “this started with Shinra”. It’s reassuring to see this here since so much of it is missing from other FF7-related works.

They’ve done some really good work to add depth to a few of the characters too. Barret is the one that comes across the strongest, as they’ve made him feel like a real political activist here, the sort that would always carry leaflets and posters in their bag just in case. He always has prepared speeches and talking points ready for any moment, and because of that comes across a lot more confident and charismatic. He’s also shown clearly to not be wrong about it all, so you could probably mine a lot of his dialogue for quotes you can pull out in real life.

Aerith shines a lot more in this game, since she’s still the same sort of confident no-nonsense character that she was in the original, it’s just that now she’s a lot funnier. Many of her remarks got a good laugh out of me.

There isn’t much new to Cloud here, and there’s also a sense that a lot of his development is being saved for future parts of Remake, since it didn’t originally happen in Midgar. His traumas are given more focus, but only to acknowledge them. Admittedly the better moments with him are when other characters react to his stoic seriousness, especially Barret and Aerith.

Tifa is the character I’m most disappointed with. It just feels like they’ve taken the same old character from the original and injected her into this game, so compared with everyone else she just seems less interesting. She does get a small arc where she has doubts if the mission to destroy Shinra’s reactors is a good idea, but because of her rather dull characterisation it’s not very interesting to see play out.

Of course even minor characters get a lot more fleshing out. Jessie, Biggs and Wedge have more screen time and at certain parts have more plot-crucial things to do. It also seems to be really going for a 90s throwback thing since Jessie says “psych” a lot. There’s even a lot more minor characters added in, some of which already existed in a novel (I’m sure that gave some FFWiki editor a sigh of relief since they didn’t have to make as many new pages).

Midgar now feels even more like a diverse collective of districts, which helps for sure since everything is so much bigger. Each location has its own distinct aesthetic right down to the colour palettes used. I could see a picture of something close up in either the Sector 7 or Sector 5 slums and tell which location it is. I really liked slowly exploring them too, as this game’s closer third-person moveable camera really lent itself well to these spaces. It would have been nice if there was a first-person view so I could get an even closer look. It really does feel more like a place people live in, especially since you’re given a place to stay in Sector 7 as well. My only frustration was with how townspeople dialogue was handled as it was cool to hear it diegetically as I walked around, but it became a little annoying to hear the same lines again as I went by the same people.

Just about everything in this game is so much bigger. Instead of immediately going into a second reactor attack after finishing the first, there’s more space for downtime with side quests available to take part in, followed by a detour to infiltrate a warehouse. Once I was on my way to the second reactor, I still had to get through two full-sized areas before getting there. 

Once I made it to the final segment of the reactor itself, that was when the Air Buster was introduced. In the original game the Air Buster was just a boss that showed up for a fight that lasted a few minutes. In Remake, it’s given a much longer build-up with an opportunity to make choices on how to sabotage it beforehand. Before fighting it members of Shinra appear as gargantuan holographic projections to taunt Cloud and company (and remain doing so throughout the fight). The fight itself is a big and bombastic three-phase boss encounter, one of the more difficult in the game and some of the most fun I had playing it. I’ll get into why I really like the combat a bit later since I want to focus a bit more on the pacing.

Though all the sections I mentioned are much larger than how they were in Final Fantasy VII, I didn’t really feel as though they were padded out. Just before I got bored of each area I was able to move onto a new part. Where I felt it really started to slow down was when I reached Wall Market. It’s the structure of it that really got to me, since characters would dangle the way forward in front of me and then say “but first you have to go and do something else for me”. I get that’s how videogames often work, but it happened too often here and I was getting a little sick of it.

Then it was followed by a sewer area that seemed to go on forever, and after that a train graveyard that felt like it existed only to pad out the game. I wonder if this is because I had recently played the original game. I really felt the length as I’d seen a shorter version of it. I’m absolutely certain that they’ve done this so that this first part is roughly just as long as the original game so people don’t feel ripped off (it actually took me longer since I did a lot of sidequests).

Thankfully some areas after this manage to justify their larger size. The race to stop the Sector 7 plate from falling becomes a much more desperate climb that seems even more tragic when the party fails to stop it. The journey up the wall to reach the game’s final area becomes a moment to pause and see the destruction that Shinra has caused by dropping the plate. It gives a moment for the party to really lay out their motivations, by showing what they want to prevent in the future. However I do wish that I didn’t have an extended stay in Hojo’s laboratory, it’s a good thing that I enjoyed Remake’s combat a lot.

It’s an action RPG combat system this time around, where button presses initiate attacks immediately, and any incoming enemy attacks must be dodged or blocked. When player attacks hit an enemy it builds up a bar which can be spent to use abilities, spells or items. What I love about this is that it brings back the same sort of tension found in turn based games, once the bar’s been spent it has to be built back up again, so care needs to be taken when deciding between big damage abilities or healing spells/items. It did bring about some tense moments where I had to choose between finishing off a weakened boss with a big attack or helping my party recover. 

There’s also a stagger bar on every enemy, something which the game has lifted from Final Fantasy XIII. In this game it’s essentially a bar that fills up by just damaging the enemy or doing more specific actions in battle. Once the bar fills up, the enemy is temporarily stunned and takes a lot more damage than normal. It felt great to do this in FF13 and it still feels good here, as it’s a moment when the pressure’s eased off and I was able to do some really big damage. 

The game almost requires a player to be constantly engaging with these systems, which meant that I actually found some of it quite hard as I was getting used to it. Air Buster is actually the moment where I found I had to do that. It’s also followed by a really good battle against Reno which shows that switching to an action RPG system lends itself really well for a 1v1 fight.

They did put a lot of minigames in here as well, but they’re mostly bad. I guess that’s true to the original game. The one I disliked the most was a stealth sequence where Cloud has to sneak out of Aerith’s house. The more realistic movement in Remake made it extremely difficult to maneuver around the collections of small items on the floor. The bike chase is still fun at least.

As usual this game is full of excellent music. Masashi Hamauzu and his team have done some brilliant work here but this is really where my metaphor of this being like seeing an old band came from. There’s some great variations of music from the original, such as an exciting take on Fight On, or a rework of the Turks Theme as a boss music. However most of the high points of the music are still when it’s playing with things from the original game. That said there is a new theme to represent Avalanche which sounds great, and ends up with a great melancholic reprise during the climb towards Shinra tower. It’s also very funny to me that Masashi Hamauzu has managed to work in some of his score for Dirge of Cerberus. Just listen to this and this for comparison.

I’ve made this sound like a big tribute act with absolute reverence to itself. For what I’ve mentioned it largely does do that, but the end of this game makes some huge changes that are foreshadowed throughout beforehand. It’s the sort of thing that has me very excited for what comes next in subsequent games.

There are a bunch of moments where it looks like things are going to play out very differently, but then a horde of ghosts show up to ensure that the events of the original game happen. They are eventually revealed to be “Whispers”, arbiters of fate who ensure destiny runs its course. The party eventually decides to fight against these Whispers, and that becomes the penultimate boss fight, but before you fight them the party sees visions of the future which are events that happen later in the original game such as Aerith’s death and Meteor heading towards the world. Those visions are described as “what would happen if we lose today”, so the party fights against the whispers and works to essentially prevent the events of Final Fantasy VII from happening! In the end they seemingly succeed, after the game throws in a fight with Sephiroth because the developers got a little impatient (though the version of One-Winged Angel made for it is stellar).

I would probably have been okay with a new version that stayed mostly true to the original, though I’d still have complaints if it had the same pacing as this. But how this game ends up feels like a clear statement that going forward, things are going to be done a little differently. Before I started Final Fantasy VII Remake, I was thinking about moments I would have liked to have seen recreated and most of them were not in the Midgar section this game is based on. Now that I’ve seen this ending I don’t care about that anymore, I want to see what new things they’re hiding up their sleeve. The end of this game brought in some big dramatic changes and I’m hungry for more of those. I’ve already played Final Fantasy VII before.

Final Thoughts

With that ending I’m very glad I went through the original Final Fantasy VII beforehand. If I didn’t already have that knowledge going in the ending would have meant nothing to me. Weirdly part of the ending involved a recreation of a scene from Crisis Core, so I can imagine a new player just being very lost to what’s going on.

After having played a bunch of older games in chronological order until the mid-90s, suddenly jumping ahead to Final Fantasy VII Remake feels almost overwhelming. A lot of differences that would have just accumulated over the course of many games have now just all appeared at once like I’ve suddenly jumped into a videogame timehole where I’m seeing the future. Soon I will have to go back in time and start up Final Fantasy Tactics, which I hope I enjoy.

Until next time!


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Immediately after releasing my last article about Final Fantasy VII, I was eager to dive into more of that universe. For this article I played:

  • Dirge of Cerberus: Final Fantasy VII
  • Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII

I was very interested to see how Square Enix would expand on the world of Final Fantasy VII, but sadly I think they did a poor job. I had a decent amount of fun with one of the games though, so it wasn’t all a waste of time. Let me tell you more about my time with them.

Dirge of Cerberus: Final Fantasy VII

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So this is the only one of the games set after Final Fantasy VII.  Specifically it takes place after the movie Advent Children, and focuses on the side character Vincent Valentine. It’s funny to me that they chose to base a game on him, especially when it’s possible to go through the entirety of FF7 without meeting him (I didn’t miss out on him though and he did turn out to be very useful). Yuffie, another previously optional party member, shows up frequently as well so I guess they also saw the humour in that.

This is actually the first ever game with Final Fantasy in the name that I ever played. Since I had ended up watching Advent Children, and even though I didn’t really understand it I thought I could get away with playing the sequel game. It looked darker and edgier than what I was used to, the crimson colours and 15 age rating on the box made it look so (near enough every main FF game has a 16+ age rating on it now though so it’s not distinct any more). I had not long finished Kingdom Hearts II, and my only other exposure to Japanese RPGs were Pokemon, Golden Sun, and Unlimited Saga (which was a nightmare game to try to understand when I was 11 years old).

What this also ended up being was one of my first exposures to third-person shooters, because it turns out that this game is a hybrid of that and an RPG (back when it was novel for RPG elements to be in a game and not just an aspect of all major videogames). It has an incredibly generous auto-aim option because I would imagine they were expecting players unfamiliar with the genre to play it. It also has mouse and keyboard support, which is very strange to see on a Playstation 2 game.

It seems as though Square Enix were inspired by Devil May Cry here, since it is an action game that runs at a very smooth 60 frames-per-second (something I tend to associate more with games made by Capcom or Konami). Vincent Valentine’s Limit Break ability is changed to be something more like Dante’s Devil Trigger, the cutscenes feature some very stylish looking action sequences, and there’s even a rail shooting segment towards the end. This game makes no attempt to hide its inspiration.

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While it’s nowhere near as good as Devil May Cry, I still was enjoying myself with it. I have a bit of a soft spot for this kind of PS2 action game, even if it isn’t greatly put together. The shooting doesn’t feel awful to do, but I found it very difficult to avoid taking damage. There were plenty of healing items available that it never became much of a problem, I found this to be a very easy game. At the end of every level I could choose between experience points to upgrade Vincent’s stats or money to buy items and upgrade guns. This meant that I did have to think a little about what I really needed to focus on, but also it didn’t come across as the harshest system since this option is also presented upon death as well. In the end putting points into guns didn’t seem to matter too much, since in the final level I was just given an extremely powerful gun that defeated almost every enemy in a single shot.

In terms of plot it actually feels so far removed enough from Final Fantasy VII that I couldn’t really get annoyed with it. Vincent gets wrapped up in a fairly ordinary save-the-world kind of plot here, it is somewhat generic. Essentially an extra-secret branch of Shinra called Deepground just wants to destroy the world in the same way that Sephiroth wanted to. Dirge of Cerberus actually feels more like a spin-off because it puts the spotlight on characters who weren’t the main focus of the original game. There’s a bunch of new characters here too, but they’re forgettable.

There is some stuff in this game about how Vincent has the power of Chaos, some sort of demon-like thing that appears to possess him. Much is said in the cutscenes about how he is really struggling to control that power but it never comes across when playing the game. This is the Limit Break ability, it can be initiated at will from the press of a button, and can be controlled just like a normal videogame character. I wished that it was something weird and uncontrollable, it would have made for something a little more interesting.

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The end of the game actually brought to mind another spin-off game about an edgy side character with guns, Shadow the Hedgehog. That’s a game I somehow managed to finish twice as a teenager (don’t ask me how, I tried playing it again a few months ago and couldn’t stand it). Vincent transforms into a superpowered form and fights through enemies while a heavy metal theme song plays. Shadow the Hedgehog does the same thing, but I can’t really say one’s ripping off the other since their Japanese release dates are only a month apart.

There’s some very good music in this game. Masashi Hamauzu is a composer who’s great at creating atmospheric music through how he uses chords and while I wouldn’t say this soundtrack is the high point of his music-making, I still really enjoyed hearing the music as I was playing this game. What I like about the music is that it feels somewhat reminiscent of Final Fantasy VII’s music, but it’s not overbearingly drowning in motifs from that game. It’s more like music built in the same key, rather than recreations of older tunes.

Dirge of Cerberus: Final Fantasy VII is very short compared to most of what I’ve played for this, it took me less than ten hours to finish it. It’s interesting as a weird curiosity to see how Square Enix tried to create a then-trendy action game but it’s far from being a great one of those to actually play. If you’re only after a third-person shooter, or Playstation 2-like action game, I’d suggest looking elsewhere.

Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII

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I’m open to the idea of prequels, since one of my favourite games, Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater, is an excellent example of one. Sadly I didn’t enjoy playing Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII as much, it ranks for me as quite possibly the dullest Final Fantasy game I’ve ever played. The combat is boring, the story is baffling, and the music is annoying.

How the game actually plays is my biggest problem. There’s some action-RPG combat here that would be mostly serviceable if it wasn’t for another odd addition. Battles have absolutely zero tension in them because of a weird slot machine system that is constantly rewarding huge bonuses to HP, constantly healing and also providing extremely powerful attacks. All of this was out of my control, the slot machine is constantly spinning automatically throughout combat, often interrupting everything to fill up the screen, occasionally presenting a flashback cutscene as well. I’m okay with games being easy, it’s not as though I’ve found many Final Fantasy games to be difficult, but this one is being ridiculous. 

I also recognise the irony with my frustration here when I wished for Dirge of Cerberus to have some elements of control being taken away in relation to his demonic powers. This system is not what I would have had in mind.

Level ups are also seemingly determined by it too, which is such a bizarre decision. There’s also equippable abilities that can be strengthened via this system. It’s rather frustrating to work with, because I don’t feel like I’ve worked towards getting these, it just feels like I’ve won them in a slot machine. 

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Combat on its own mostly feels like a slowed-down Kingdom Hearts. Zack can be moved around a 3D arena, and attacks and abilities can be initiated from a command menu. It seemed to work okay most of the time, though it’s supposed to auto-target the nearest enemy but sometimes Zack would run off to attack one on the other side of the screen instead. It’s an odd choice because positioning is a key aspect of the combat, since hitting an enemy from behind does double damage. This was a little harder to pull off when I was at the game’s whim for who Zack is attacking.

There is actually one fight in the game that I thought was pretty good. It took place on a bridge and if Zack was pushed to the edge of it, the game was over. Because I had focused on increasing physical attack power, it meant that I had an interesting tension between using long ranged spells that did less damage, or moving in closer to hit harder and also risk getting hit by the enemy. I’d probably be a lot more forgiving of it all if there were more interesting gimmicks like this.

A lot of the game involved running through small, empty environments to go between combat encounters and story cutscenes. There’s no stopping in towns because all shops can be accessed via the pause menu at any time. It’s pieces are very bite-sized in the way that a lot of portable games used to be, owing to it being made for the Playstation Portable. At save points extra missions can be accessed, which usually take about five minutes each to finish. None of them are particularly interesting, it’s just more small pieces of game that could fit into short gaps like a commute.

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There’s also some occasional minigames that crop up, and most of them are awful. I thought Final Fantasy VII had some rubbishy ones but they are so much worse in this game. My least favourites have to be the seemingly impossible stealth sequence, and a sniping one that controls terribly. They’re rather jarring as well since they seemingly pop up out of nowhere, as if the game is just being interrupted by something else.

The presentation of this game doesn’t do it a lot of favours. Environments mostly being made up of small corridors shown through a camera that sticks close to the controllable character just makes them feel tiny. It’s not as though Final Fantasy VII actually had massive areas that took considerable amounts of time to walk through, it was able to use fixed camera angles in order to make them appear bigger. Junon Airport was an area that seemed massive before now looks tiny in Crisis Core.

A part that really suffers because of this is the Nibelheim incident, originally depicted in a flashback in FF7, which I had highlighted in my last blog post as a really effective sequence. What was previously a quiet and unsettling journey beneath a mansion is now turned into an extremely generic RPG dungeon full of enemy encounters. The camera work in the cutscenes is much worse too, as it fits in some recreated shots that have much less going on. There’s a shot of Sephiroth where the camera is moving away from him instead of him getting more distant and it just comes across as passive. It also shoe horns in its own new characters in ways that just feel clunky.

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All of the brand new plot developments added into this game are bad and at times confusing. I found it really difficult to understand the motivations of the new characters. It seems like the game is setting things up for Zack’s former mentor Angeal to betray everyone and then he just kinda doesn’t? It’s weird. Genesis never feels like he actually belongs in the game. It feels like so much of the plot could still happen without him, but he’s there because it seemed like they were setting something up to pay off in a later game which never happened.

I couldn’t stand a lot of the music here as well. There’s a lot of covers of music from Final Fantasy VII that aren’t great, and a lot of the new music sounds incredibly repetitive since a lot of it is playing around a single motif. A lot of the battle themes are metal music that I found incredibly boring. It’s also almost inaudible when played off of a PSP speaker, so to actually hear it you’d need headphones.

This isn’t a very good game, but if I played it when it came out in 2008 I reckon I would’ve loved it. I was 15 then so probably the right age to get really into it, maybe I would be nostalgic for it and be a little more forgiving. However, I played it now and I found it to be incredibly lacking.

Final Thoughts

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These games, the movie Advent Children, and a bunch of other things make up what Square Enix likes to call the “Compilation of Final Fantasy VII”. It’s ended up being a failed experiment to be honest. While I did have a little amount of fun with Dirge of Cerberus, everything else in it was bad.

There’s some tie-in novels that are also part of it that I’ve been reading and they’re terrible. They both attempt to bridge the gap between the original game and Advent Children and somehow manage to make every character even worse. I wouldn’t recommend reading them.

The impression that I get is that everyone responsible for all of this media has no clue what made the original game great. Kazushige Nojima, the man responsible for a lot of the writing in these things, was also one of the main writers on the original as well. I think that it makes it very clear that the team efforts on Final Fantasy VII were more likely what made that game better.

Even though I do have all these complaints, my excitement to play Final Fantasy VII Remake has not diminished at all. That will be what my next article is about, please look forward to it!

Don’t forget to check out the Playing Final Fantasy From the Start hub page to see the rest of the articles I’ve written about the series!

Until next time!



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