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Immediately after releasing my last article about Final Fantasy VII, I was eager to dive into more of that universe. For this article I played:

  • Dirge of Cerberus: Final Fantasy VII
  • Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII

I was very interested to see how Square Enix would expand on the world of Final Fantasy VII, but sadly I think they did a poor job. I had a decent amount of fun with one of the games though, so it wasn’t all a waste of time. Let me tell you more about my time with them.

Dirge of Cerberus: Final Fantasy VII

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So this is the only one of the games set after Final Fantasy VII.  Specifically it takes place after the movie Advent Children, and focuses on the side character Vincent Valentine. It’s funny to me that they chose to base a game on him, especially when it’s possible to go through the entirety of FF7 without meeting him (I didn’t miss out on him though and he did turn out to be very useful). Yuffie, another previously optional party member, shows up frequently as well so I guess they also saw the humour in that.

This is actually the first ever game with Final Fantasy in the name that I ever played. Since I had ended up watching Advent Children, and even though I didn’t really understand it I thought I could get away with playing the sequel game. It looked darker and edgier than what I was used to, the crimson colours and 15 age rating on the box made it look so (near enough every main FF game has a 16+ age rating on it now though so it’s not distinct any more). I had not long finished Kingdom Hearts II, and my only other exposure to Japanese RPGs were Pokemon, Golden Sun, and Unlimited Saga (which was a nightmare game to try to understand when I was 11 years old).

What this also ended up being was one of my first exposures to third-person shooters, because it turns out that this game is a hybrid of that and an RPG (back when it was novel for RPG elements to be in a game and not just an aspect of all major videogames). It has an incredibly generous auto-aim option because I would imagine they were expecting players unfamiliar with the genre to play it. It also has mouse and keyboard support, which is very strange to see on a Playstation 2 game.

It seems as though Square Enix were inspired by Devil May Cry here, since it is an action game that runs at a very smooth 60 frames-per-second (something I tend to associate more with games made by Capcom or Konami). Vincent Valentine’s Limit Break ability is changed to be something more like Dante’s Devil Trigger, the cutscenes feature some very stylish looking action sequences, and there’s even a rail shooting segment towards the end. This game makes no attempt to hide its inspiration.

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While it’s nowhere near as good as Devil May Cry, I still was enjoying myself with it. I have a bit of a soft spot for this kind of PS2 action game, even if it isn’t greatly put together. The shooting doesn’t feel awful to do, but I found it very difficult to avoid taking damage. There were plenty of healing items available that it never became much of a problem, I found this to be a very easy game. At the end of every level I could choose between experience points to upgrade Vincent’s stats or money to buy items and upgrade guns. This meant that I did have to think a little about what I really needed to focus on, but also it didn’t come across as the harshest system since this option is also presented upon death as well. In the end putting points into guns didn’t seem to matter too much, since in the final level I was just given an extremely powerful gun that defeated almost every enemy in a single shot.

In terms of plot it actually feels so far removed enough from Final Fantasy VII that I couldn’t really get annoyed with it. Vincent gets wrapped up in a fairly ordinary save-the-world kind of plot here, it is somewhat generic. Essentially an extra-secret branch of Shinra called Deepground just wants to destroy the world in the same way that Sephiroth wanted to. Dirge of Cerberus actually feels more like a spin-off because it puts the spotlight on characters who weren’t the main focus of the original game. There’s a bunch of new characters here too, but they’re forgettable.

There is some stuff in this game about how Vincent has the power of Chaos, some sort of demon-like thing that appears to possess him. Much is said in the cutscenes about how he is really struggling to control that power but it never comes across when playing the game. This is the Limit Break ability, it can be initiated at will from the press of a button, and can be controlled just like a normal videogame character. I wished that it was something weird and uncontrollable, it would have made for something a little more interesting.

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The end of the game actually brought to mind another spin-off game about an edgy side character with guns, Shadow the Hedgehog. That’s a game I somehow managed to finish twice as a teenager (don’t ask me how, I tried playing it again a few months ago and couldn’t stand it). Vincent transforms into a superpowered form and fights through enemies while a heavy metal theme song plays. Shadow the Hedgehog does the same thing, but I can’t really say one’s ripping off the other since their Japanese release dates are only a month apart.

There’s some very good music in this game. Masashi Hamauzu is a composer who’s great at creating atmospheric music through how he uses chords and while I wouldn’t say this soundtrack is the high point of his music-making, I still really enjoyed hearing the music as I was playing this game. What I like about the music is that it feels somewhat reminiscent of Final Fantasy VII’s music, but it’s not overbearingly drowning in motifs from that game. It’s more like music built in the same key, rather than recreations of older tunes.

Dirge of Cerberus: Final Fantasy VII is very short compared to most of what I’ve played for this, it took me less than ten hours to finish it. It’s interesting as a weird curiosity to see how Square Enix tried to create a then-trendy action game but it’s far from being a great one of those to actually play. If you’re only after a third-person shooter, or Playstation 2-like action game, I’d suggest looking elsewhere.

Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII

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I’m open to the idea of prequels, since one of my favourite games, Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater, is an excellent example of one. Sadly I didn’t enjoy playing Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII as much, it ranks for me as quite possibly the dullest Final Fantasy game I’ve ever played. The combat is boring, the story is baffling, and the music is annoying.

How the game actually plays is my biggest problem. There’s some action-RPG combat here that would be mostly serviceable if it wasn’t for another odd addition. Battles have absolutely zero tension in them because of a weird slot machine system that is constantly rewarding huge bonuses to HP, constantly healing and also providing extremely powerful attacks. All of this was out of my control, the slot machine is constantly spinning automatically throughout combat, often interrupting everything to fill up the screen, occasionally presenting a flashback cutscene as well. I’m okay with games being easy, it’s not as though I’ve found many Final Fantasy games to be difficult, but this one is being ridiculous. 

I also recognise the irony with my frustration here when I wished for Dirge of Cerberus to have some elements of control being taken away in relation to his demonic powers. This system is not what I would have had in mind.

Level ups are also seemingly determined by it too, which is such a bizarre decision. There’s also equippable abilities that can be strengthened via this system. It’s rather frustrating to work with, because I don’t feel like I’ve worked towards getting these, it just feels like I’ve won them in a slot machine. 

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Combat on its own mostly feels like a slowed-down Kingdom Hearts. Zack can be moved around a 3D arena, and attacks and abilities can be initiated from a command menu. It seemed to work okay most of the time, though it’s supposed to auto-target the nearest enemy but sometimes Zack would run off to attack one on the other side of the screen instead. It’s an odd choice because positioning is a key aspect of the combat, since hitting an enemy from behind does double damage. This was a little harder to pull off when I was at the game’s whim for who Zack is attacking.

There is actually one fight in the game that I thought was pretty good. It took place on a bridge and if Zack was pushed to the edge of it, the game was over. Because I had focused on increasing physical attack power, it meant that I had an interesting tension between using long ranged spells that did less damage, or moving in closer to hit harder and also risk getting hit by the enemy. I’d probably be a lot more forgiving of it all if there were more interesting gimmicks like this.

A lot of the game involved running through small, empty environments to go between combat encounters and story cutscenes. There’s no stopping in towns because all shops can be accessed via the pause menu at any time. It’s pieces are very bite-sized in the way that a lot of portable games used to be, owing to it being made for the Playstation Portable. At save points extra missions can be accessed, which usually take about five minutes each to finish. None of them are particularly interesting, it’s just more small pieces of game that could fit into short gaps like a commute.

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There’s also some occasional minigames that crop up, and most of them are awful. I thought Final Fantasy VII had some rubbishy ones but they are so much worse in this game. My least favourites have to be the seemingly impossible stealth sequence, and a sniping one that controls terribly. They’re rather jarring as well since they seemingly pop up out of nowhere, as if the game is just being interrupted by something else.

The presentation of this game doesn’t do it a lot of favours. Environments mostly being made up of small corridors shown through a camera that sticks close to the controllable character just makes them feel tiny. It’s not as though Final Fantasy VII actually had massive areas that took considerable amounts of time to walk through, it was able to use fixed camera angles in order to make them appear bigger. Junon Airport was an area that seemed massive before now looks tiny in Crisis Core.

A part that really suffers because of this is the Nibelheim incident, originally depicted in a flashback in FF7, which I had highlighted in my last blog post as a really effective sequence. What was previously a quiet and unsettling journey beneath a mansion is now turned into an extremely generic RPG dungeon full of enemy encounters. The camera work in the cutscenes is much worse too, as it fits in some recreated shots that have much less going on. There’s a shot of Sephiroth where the camera is moving away from him instead of him getting more distant and it just comes across as passive. It also shoe horns in its own new characters in ways that just feel clunky.

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All of the brand new plot developments added into this game are bad and at times confusing. I found it really difficult to understand the motivations of the new characters. It seems like the game is setting things up for Zack’s former mentor Angeal to betray everyone and then he just kinda doesn’t? It’s weird. Genesis never feels like he actually belongs in the game. It feels like so much of the plot could still happen without him, but he’s there because it seemed like they were setting something up to pay off in a later game which never happened.

I couldn’t stand a lot of the music here as well. There’s a lot of covers of music from Final Fantasy VII that aren’t great, and a lot of the new music sounds incredibly repetitive since a lot of it is playing around a single motif. A lot of the battle themes are metal music that I found incredibly boring. It’s also almost inaudible when played off of a PSP speaker, so to actually hear it you’d need headphones.

This isn’t a very good game, but if I played it when it came out in 2008 I reckon I would’ve loved it. I was 15 then so probably the right age to get really into it, maybe I would be nostalgic for it and be a little more forgiving. However, I played it now and I found it to be incredibly lacking.

Final Thoughts

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These games, the movie Advent Children, and a bunch of other things make up what Square Enix likes to call the “Compilation of Final Fantasy VII”. It’s ended up being a failed experiment to be honest. While I did have a little amount of fun with Dirge of Cerberus, everything else in it was bad.

There’s some tie-in novels that are also part of it that I’ve been reading and they’re terrible. They both attempt to bridge the gap between the original game and Advent Children and somehow manage to make every character even worse. I wouldn’t recommend reading them.

The impression that I get is that everyone responsible for all of this media has no clue what made the original game great. Kazushige Nojima, the man responsible for a lot of the writing in these things, was also one of the main writers on the original as well. I think that it makes it very clear that the team efforts on Final Fantasy VII were more likely what made that game better.

Even though I do have all these complaints, my excitement to play Final Fantasy VII Remake has not diminished at all. That will be what my next article is about, please look forward to it!

Don’t forget to check out the Playing Final Fantasy From the Start hub page to see the rest of the articles I’ve written about the series!

Until next time!