Trying to understand how games work

Monthly Archives: March 2021

I have a bit of an odd relationship with Mega Man. I’m generally fascinated by the series but I haven’t enjoyed a lot of the games. In the past I’ve made attempts to get into the classic platformers like Mega Man 2 and found that they aren’t for me. The 90s-anime look of the Mega Man X series appeals to me more, but even then the only ones of those I’ve actually put time into are X4 and X7.

Eleven-year-old me adored Mega Man X7. I don’t think I could think of a game as being bad back then, only that some just seemed very difficult. I just didn’t have big expectations for what a game should be like in three dimensions, as I only had a console capable of playing 3D games for a few months at that time. The only way I could manage to get through the game as a child was by using a cheat device.

That led to me getting Mega Man X Command Mission later that year, which I played, didn’t finish and my copy has sat on various shelves for about 16 years. There was a lot more novelty about an RPG being made out of a platformer back in the mid-00s. Nowadays it’s more of a surprise when a game doesn’t feature some kind of RPG growth system.

This is a full-on turn-based RPG that doesn’t carry over many mechanics from the platformers it relates to. Instead it’s more concerned with moving the characters and aesthetics into a new genre. More thought was put into how X and Zero work as RPG party members, rather than how something like jumping and shooting would work.

That said, this game is full of missed opportunities. A lot of it feels underdeveloped, from repetitive combat to paper-thin characters. I didn’t have particularly high expectations for Mega Man X Command Mission, but I was surprised by how disappointing it was.

Narratively it’s very strange. X and friends have to fight against a group called the Rebellion Army. Why are they rebelling? I don’t actually know. Their leader Epsilon talks about pursuing nebulous goals like some sort of sentient motivational video. To fight them X joins a group called the Resistance, which may have been their second choice for a name as Rebellion was already taken.

The game also doesn’t take advantage of the fact that there’s a party with seven characters in it. Outside of their introductory stages, most of them seem to barely appear outside of combat.

It’s all told with an exceptionally Canadian-sounding dub of low quality, which strangely enough I actually liked. It’s a specific sort of bad game voice-acting which you just don’t hear anymore. The professional quality of acting in games seems to have gone up a lot in the last couple decades, which sadly means that a bad performance is often a dull one rather than a weird one.

Even with that to keep me mildly fascinated, I ended up bored because of how the game played. Combat is extremely repetitive, which wouldn’t be too much of an issue if it wasn’t exceptionally button-mashy at times. One of the healing moves requires such an excessive amount of analogue stick-twirling that it was hurting my wrists. It was unavoidable due to how limited other means of healing were.

There isn’t much excitement to the exploration either, as most places consist of futuristic warehouse corridors. It all blends together so that no area can stick out in my mind.

However, the movement is really fun. The one major thing that this game takes from Mega Man X is the ability to dash. I never stopped dashing to move around as it has a good amount of control and covers a good amount of distance without losing momentum. It’s a nice thing to keep fidgeting with over the course of the game.

Some of the complaints I have could be thrown at other RPGs that I like, but the difference here is that there isn’t much to tie it all together. The aspects I like work in isolation. The dash is fun and the voice-acting is silly but those don’t build on anything else. It’s also much more difficult to ignore the things I don’t like surrounding that.

Playing this game has actually been worthwhile. It’s made me think more about what I like about videogames, and how I’m able to express that. I would be more annoyed if I only played this to pass time. Even though I had some issues with Mega Man X Command Mission, it was nice to find some joy in it.


This article contains spoilers for both Final Fantasy X and Final Fantasy X-2.

At the end of Final Fantasy X the world has dramatically changed. Sin is no longer a constant threat and major organisations have fallen apart. The game doesn’t actually do much to show you the results of that. A big speech is given and the game ends.

So Final Fantasy X-2 shows very quickly how the world has changed. For a start this isn’t the mostly linear journey like the preceding game. Almost every area is open to be explored from the beginning, which felt a little overwhelming to me.

Yuna, the summoner from FFX, is now a “sphere hunter”, one of many in search of ball-shaped recorded videos showing Spira’s history. Most sphere hunters seem to be doing it for the sense of adventure found in hunting for these items. Yuna started because she received a sphere showing someone who looked like Tidus, who died at the end of the last game.

But how has the world of Spira changed materially? This game has a reputation for being seen as the “fun and frivolous one”, but I was surprised by how bleak it actually seemed from the start. Things have gotten better in some ways (less people are dying from random monster attacks), but it doesn’t feel as though much work is being done to improve the world in other ways.

The Mi’ihen Highroad, a place many summoners walked down, no longer has anyone travelling on foot. When Yuna and the party walk through it, people remark how strange that is. Most travel across it is now done by hovercraft, which costs money. The place is now also patrolled by sentry machines which are supposed to take care of monsters, but haven’t had the best history of safety, and at one point start attacking people.

The former final stop on a summoner’s journey, Zanarkand, is now a tourist hotspot. People travel from all over the world to feel like they’re going on an adventure. There are even treasure chests for sale. The Zanarkand of the old Spira was a very traumatic place. It was the place where many summoners would go to die in order to maintain the lies of Yevon. Now it has been transformed into a theme park.

These are only a few examples. Industry and commerce have moved into places previously dominated by religious dogma, and haven’t proven to be a good replacement either. Factions have been set up with the intention of taking places for themselves. The villain of the game is a victim of a war that took place 1,000 years ago who feels unhappy that the world just hasn’t changed enough.

But it isn’t beyond saving. Final Fantasy X-2 actually has a much more positive and optimistic outlook on all of this, it just makes one thing very clear: it takes a lot of work to fix everything. Yuna looks around at the world and sees that not many people are doing anything to save it, so she feels she has to.

Yuna can stop the dangerous machines at the Mi’ihen Highroad by dismantling them. Yuna can reduce the level of tourism in Zanarkand by encouraging wildlife to breed. Yuna can resolve conflicts between others. It genuinely takes a lot of work for a player to do this and most of it is optional and can be easily missed.

I ended up burning out on it and only resolved a fraction of the problems. Partly because in some cases I couldn’t because of something I missed at an earlier stage. This is all tracked in-game by a completion percentage. I’ve been told by many that to achieve 100% on the first go, a guide needs to be checked considerably often.

Areas have to be visited several times over and over. After a while they get boring to travel through, as most of them retain the same structure as seen in Final Fantasy X, so very few of them have something new. The straight-line structure many of these places have doesn’t suit repeat visits well, and the music that plays in them is annoying and repetitive.

Battles got tiring too. They initially seemed interesting, as they brought back the Active Time Battle system from older games, and also included mechanics that built off of it being in real time. For one example, if party member attacks happen around the same time, they can become a combo which increases the amount of damage done. Eventually my party became powerful enough that I didn’t need to think about that, and I spent most combat encounters on auto-pilot.

It doesn’t feel like these sorts of annoyances are in conflict with the game itself. It’s all things that make it feel as though Spira is very resistant to change. Yuna’s personality also seems to provide context for the game structure too, as she seems to have taken on Tidus’ desires to actively provide help to people, even if it requires a detour.

Putting in all of this effort pays off too. Do enough work and Tidus will be brought back to life. The only way to unlock the game’s perfect ending is by achieving 100% completion (of course that’s not the only way to actually see it, thanks Youtube). This adds on an extra scene which is a conversation where Tidus tells Yuna that there’s a possibility he could still disappear again. This also underscores that they have to actively work to keep things how they want them, much like how Yuna did for the rest of the world.

Playing through Final Fantasy X-2 was a strange experience for me. I wasn’t really enjoying it so much in the second half. When I finished it, I began to put everything together and really appreciated what it was doing. In writing this piece I actually grew fonder for the game. Maybe I’ll like it more on a second go with all of this in mind.



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