Trying to understand how games work

Monthly Archives: February 2022

I’ve been playing through all sorts of Final Fantasy games over the past two years and part of the appeal of taking on a whole franchise is finding surprises. The great ones that haven’t stayed in the lasting conversations but turn out to be hidden gems. I don’t know if I could often expect that from a billion dollar mega-franchise like this. I certainly didn’t find that with the Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles prequels made for DS and Wii.

People certainly talked about these when they came out, as evidenced by forum threads that are still available to read, but they’re not the games people continue to bring up. It’s not because they’re bad, as they’re perfectly serviceable action role-playing games. When it’s part of a brand that sees much more critically-acclaimed entries with high profile marketing campaigns, the heavy hitters are going to steal more attention. As I didn’t have experience with most Final Fantasy games around their original release dates, I was only more aware of the bigger titles. I lack the context for many of these games as I wasn’t there for them.

Right now I want to put the spotlight on Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles: Ring of Fates and Echoes of Time. Both of them are built off of the same co-op action framework, the basics are almost identical between the two. As with the original Crystal Chronicles, these games involve travelling into dungeons to fight a boss at the end of them, though with a much more linear structure as opposed to the more open one the first game had. They’re faster paced games than the original too, with a more ordinary experience-point growth system. These ones also involve platforming and puzzles to mix things up. The way they play reminds me a little bit of Threads of Fate, another action RPG Square developed for the Playstation which I played for a few hours, and didn’t return to because I ended up very busy at the time. I’d like to return to that one someday.

Ring of Fates is the more traditional of the two released on the Nintendo DS. Its singleplayer and multiplayer separated into two separate modes. Those going solo can play the “story mode” which is what I went for. It’s fairly generic stuff: a pair of orphaned children going on an adventure and getting a party together that eventually defeat a villain that wants to rule the world. A surprising amount of cutscenes were fully voiced as well, which isn’t something I’d expect even from some of the bigger releases on the console (as far as I remember anyway, if you can remember a bunch of other examples I’m curious to know about them).

It’s a very easy-going game too. At no point did I feel challenged by the combat, nor was I stumped by the puzzles or platforming. In the game’s party of four, the player controls one character at a time while the others are AI-controlled. The controllable character can be swapped at any time. Each one is of a different species (those being Clavat, Yuke, Selkie and Lilty) which results in them having different gimmicks, some of them being touch-screen based considering the system this was made for. What this means is that swapping between the characters is required at times, though I only did it when it was absolutely necessary. The lead Clavat character is able to deal damage a lot quicker than all the others so I was often playing as that character. The other occasionally useful character was the Selkie as they have a double jump, which makes platforming simpler.

What this resulted in was a game that was mostly light fun. I don’t think I’ll remember the particulars of it in the future, but if the game comes up in a conversation I’m certain to say something like “yeah that one was alright”. Not everything needs to be a genre-defining classic anyway.

Echoes of Time was where I had a much rougher experience. It felt like everything was dialled up to be a bigger experience. More combat! More puzzles! More platforming! Larger levels! All of them mixed together in some ways that were fun and others that were frustrating.

This game’s dungeons feel a little closer to Zelda dungeons this time. However, they don’t feature the structure of finding items in order to solve problems. What it does have is puzzles that continue across multiple rooms with particular gimmicks to them. Also a boss key has to be found too. There are much less dungeons in this game, and instead it repeats a handful of them a few times. This isn’t much of an issue as it closes off unnecessary rooms on each revisit, and does a decent job of directing a player to new stuff. I often didn’t need to consult the game’s map.

Many of these puzzles involve pushing blocks, activating switches, or carrying items around. These don’t use any character specific gimmicks as they are mostly removed from this game. The Selkie can still double jump, but everyone else is just there for fighting. This is because the game doesn’t have a set party, it has to be created. A player can make a bunch of characters of whatever in-game species they choose, and put them together for a party of four. I opted for one of each and still ended up mostly playing as the Clavat because they still did the most damage. 

The reason for this is that the singleplayer and multiplayer sections are now combined into the same thing. I could take my created character and bring them over into other people’s games. If I knew others with the game we could have taken on dungeons together. Because I didn’t know anybody else with the game (and didn’t ask) I opted to settle with AI-controlled characters.

For some reason, those AI party members that joined me on this adventure wanted to make things harder. They don’t really do much in combat, their rate of attacks seemed exceptionally slow. They had a habit of walking into hazards that would do a lot of damage to them. During many of the puzzles that involved pushing blocks onto switches, they would often move those blocks away, or push them into inconvenient places. The game has gates that require four characters to continue progress, so I had to bring them with me. It didn’t help that combat also occurred in more puzzle rooms as the game went on, and in rooms without fighting, the game would still have plenty of hazards to hurt the party.

I haven’t gotten to the strangest part of this game. While it was released on the DS like Ring of Fates, Echoes of Time also released on the Wii and it’s the version I played. It’s such a strange port, as it just puts the two screens of a DS game on the screen, you should really take a look at it. Anything that requires the touch-screen uses the Wii remote pointer controls. There’s barely any graphical differences too, outside of higher resolution and some light texture filtering. (I’ve used screenshots from the DS version in this article as I was unable to source ones for the Wii).

Because of this a lot of touch-screen gimmicks were taken out of this game. Though they do introduce scratch cards, which were tricky to do with pointer controls, as they required a little bit of precision. They were frustrating to begin with, but I stubbornly kept trying them until I actually kept winning on a lot of them. My reward for doing so was a temporary buff that would let every character double jump, but if I used it I wouldn’t have much use for my Selkie.

It is very funny for me to imagine someone receiving this version of the game removed from all context. Without the knowledge that it’s a port of a DS game would make its dual-screen interface come across as bizarre and unnecessary. The novelty of the port certainly attracted me (it was also cheaper).

As I said earlier, these are perfectly serviceable action role-playing games. I may have found some faults with Echoes of Time, but there were still portions of that game where I was having a good time. What they’ve actually ended up being for me is stops on my journey until I get to more interesting things (I hope). That said, I’ll still be playing Crystal Chronicles games for a little longer.


The world of Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles begins in a bad state. Everywhere is covered in a poisonous miasma, leaving adventurers joining caravans to journey in search of “myrrh”. This substance helps to fuel crystals which keep a safe atmosphere around villages. 

Eventually after a few years, a hero hears a few odd rumours that could lead them towards ridding the world of the miasma. This hero tried to get others to join them, but ended up going it alone. They had heard tales of four-person parties who spent the entire journey together (though they required special equipment). The only company this hero had was a moogle who would frequently complain about how tired they were.

Things seemed bleak for the world as only one person was there to save it. There were people the hero would come across in their journey who would only stay for small conversations. They never joined the hero on their trips to dungeons. The hero would make memories, but they were often never shared.

This is a roundabout way of me saying that the online multiplayer for Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles Remastered Edition is dead. I tried multiple times to look for games but I had no luck. It doesn’t help that Square Enix made the baffling decision for progression to be tied solely to the host player, leaving no incentive for anyone to join in.

It left me a bit disappointed, as this game feels purpose built for cooperative play. It’s a stripped-down Diablo-style console role-playing game that’s very simple to understand. Simplicity is perfect for co-operative games, it was the appeal of most of the Lego games made in the last 17 years. It made it so much easier to convince people to join in.

So many aspects of the game made me feel like I was missing out on something by playing alone. Health is displayed as a small collection of hearts, so it’s easier to parse for multiple players. The camera is far back enough to leave room for everyone to run around. Spells can be held onto to allow time for other players to combine theirs with it. Too much was purpose built to remind me that I should have been playing this with other people. 

The story even puts an emphasis on communities and groups. As you traverse the map you can run into other caravans, which almost always include multiple people in them. Anyone alone is either lost or in/causing trouble.

There are parts of this game which could annoy a group. For one it’s still a role-playing game built around character growth, which wouldn’t be too much of an issue if it used a more traditional method. At the end of a dungeon characters are rewarded a choice of individually named artefacts, which can raise stats by somewhere between 1-5 points. However, artefacts you’ve already collected can often show up, and you can only keep one of each, leading to situations where I finished a dungeon with no stat upgrades. It’s annoying enough alone so I can’t imagine it going down well in a group.

I don’t only have bad things to say about the game. The combat has a good rhythm to it, especially during bosses. I was always kept on the move, avoiding attacks and finding the good windows for hitting back or healing myself. Most of the time I didn’t feel like I was getting hit by cheap shots.

I also love how cosy the soundtrack by Kumi Tanioka feels, which the game’s colour choices reinforce too. The character designs by Toshiyuki Itahana continue the same aesthetics of the great work he did for Final Fantasy IX. The same people seem to come back for later games in this sub-series, so I am looking forward to future sights and sounds I will come across in the rest of the Crystal Chronicles.

While I was left with mixed feelings on this game in particular, that has not eliminated my curiosity for what comes next. I just hope they’re games that play better alone.

And what happened to that hero? They had almost eliminated the source of the miasma, but gave up just before doing so. They didn’t fancy the grind required to finish the job. Guess they weren’t much of a hero.



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